12 business phrasal verbs you should know

English is the main language in business worldwide, so many people study it to help with their careers. And phrasal verbs are an essential part of English and how to communicate well when speaking it.

So, learning business phrasal verbs is a must, and the best way of doing it is by seeing them in context. We made a list of some of the most common ones with explanations so that you may know what they mean and how they can be used.

 

  • Called in: to be asked to do something.
    Ex.: I was called in by the boss.

 

  • Call off: to cancel something.
    Ex.: We’ll need to call off the meeting this afternoon.

 

  • Catch up: to do something that needs or should be done urgently.
    Ex.: I have to catch up with my emails.

 

  • Chip in: to contribute or help with something.
    Ex.: If everyone chip in, we’ll be able to finish sooner than later.

 

  • Fill in: to take someone’s place temporarily.
    Ex.: The vice-president is filling in for the president.

 

  • Get ahead: to stand out, move up or improve in your career.
    Ex.: I was told I need to put in the hours if I want to get ahead.

 

  • Get back (to someone): to reply to a call, message, etc., usually later.
    Ex.: I’ll need to get back to you on that.

 

  • Press on: to continue doing something, usually against setbacks.
    Ex.: We’ll just have to press on and hope to meet the deadline.

 

  • Putting in: to give or dedicate time to a task.
    Ex.: We’re putting in the hours to finish the project.

 

  • Run by: to inform someone of something (and usually ask for their confirmation).
    Ex.: You’ll need to run this by the client.

 

  • Step in: the same as ‘fill in’.
    Ex.: I’m stepping in for my boss next week.

 

  • Work (something) out: to reach an agreement.
    Ex.: We should work something out about the schedule.

 

Fixation Exercises

1. Complete the sentences below:

a) Our boss is leaving on vacation next week. Peter will be __________.
b) No one agrees about what should be the next priority. We need to __________.
c) Oh, my! I just got back from vacation and look at this inbox! I have to __________ with my emails.
d) We finished the campaign, but still have to __________ the client.
e) The building will be out of power this afternoon, but we need to __________ to meet the deadline.

 

 

12 business phrasal verbs que você precisa saber

O inglês é o principal idioma dos negócios no mundo todo, por isso muitas pessoas o aprendem para ajudar nas suas carreiras. E os phrasal verbs são uma
parte essencial do inglês e de como se comunicar bem ao falar a língua.

Então, aprender business phrasal verbs é uma necessidade, e a melhor de fazer isso é vê-los em contexto. Fizemos uma lista dos mais comuns, com explicações
para que você possa saber o que significam e como podem ser usados.

 

  • Called in: ser chamado(a) para fazer alguma coisa.
    Ex.: I was called in by the boss.

 

  • Call off: cancelar algum compromisso.
    Ex.: We’ll need to call off the meeting this afternoon.

 

  • Catch up: fazer algo que precisa ou deve ser feito com urgência.
    Ex.: I have to catch up with my emails.

 

  • Chip in: contribuir ou ajudar com alguma coisa.
    Ex.: If everyone chip in, we’ll be able to finish sooner than later.

 

  • Fill in: tomar o lugar de alguém temporariamente.
    Ex.: The vice-president is filling in for the president.

 

  • Get ahead: se destacar, ascender ou melhorar na sua carreira.
    Ex.: I was told I need to put in the hours if I want to get ahead.

 

  • Get back (to someone): responder uma ligação, mensagem, etc., geralmente depois.
    Ex.: I’ll need to get back to you on that.

 

  • Press on: continuar a fazer algo, geralmente apesar de contratempos.
    Ex.: We’ll just have to press on and hope to meet the deadline.

 

  • Putting in: dedicar tempo a uma tarefa.
    Ex.: We’re putting in the hours to finish the project.

 

  • Run by: informar alguém de algo (normalmente, pedindo sua confirmação).
    Ex.: You’ll need to run this by the client.

 

  • Step in: o mesmo que “fill in”.
    Ex.: I’m stepping in for my boss next week.

 

  • Work (something) out: alcançar ou conseguir um acordo.
    Ex.: We should work something out about the schedule.

 

Exercícios

1. Complete as frases abaixo:

a) Our boss is leaving on vacation next week. Peter will be __________.
b) No one agrees about what should be the next priority. We need to __________.
c) Oh, my! I just got back from vacation and look at this inbox! I have to __________ with my emails.
d) We finished the campaign, but still have to __________ the client.
e) The building will be out of power this afternoon, but we need to __________ to meet the deadline.

 

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